April 17, 2014
Maximilien Luce - Morning, Interior [1890] on Flickr.The painting represents Gustave Perrot, a close friend of Luce and a fellow Neo-Impressionist. 
[Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York - Oil on canvas, 64.8 x 81 cm]

Maximilien Luce - Morning, Interior [1890] on Flickr.

The painting represents Gustave Perrot, a close friend of Luce and a fellow Neo-Impressionist.

[Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York - Oil on canvas, 64.8 x 81 cm]

April 17, 2014
Auguste Renoir - Picking Flowers [1875] on Flickr.[National Gallery of Art, Washington - Oil on canvas, 54.3 x 65.2 cm]

Auguste Renoir - Picking Flowers [1875] on Flickr.

[National Gallery of Art, Washington - Oil on canvas, 54.3 x 65.2 cm]

April 17, 2014
Ford Madox Brown - The Coat of Many Colours [1864-66] on Flickr.[Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool - Oil on canvas, 107.5 x 103.2 cm]

Ford Madox Brown - The Coat of Many Colours [1864-66] on Flickr.

[Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool - Oil on canvas, 107.5 x 103.2 cm]

April 16, 2014
Maurice Denis - April [1892] on Flickr.Maurice Denis (Granville, November 25, 1870 - Paris, November 13, 1943) was a French painter, and one of the leading artists and theoreticians of the Symbolist movement. 
Denis studied at the Académie Julian (1888) under Jules Lefebvre and at the École des Beaux-Arts. Reacting against the naturalistic tendencies of Impressionism, Denis fell under the influence of the work of Paul Gauguin, whose style was also much admired by Denis’s fellow students Paul Sérusier, Édouard Vuillard, Pierre Bonnard, and Ker Xavier Roussel. With these friends, Denis joined in the Symbolist movement and its later offshoot, the group of painters collectively called the Nabis. The quasi-mystical attitude of the Nabis was perfectly suited to Denis’ highly religious nature. In 1890 Denis expressed the underlying principle of much modern painting in the following often-quoted words: “It should be remembered that a picture, before being a warhorse, a nude, or an anecdote of some sort, is essentially a flat surface covered with colours assembled in a certain order.”
Later, however, after visiting Italy, Denis became greatly influenced by the works of the great Italian fresco painters of the 14th and 15th centuries and began to place emphasis on subject matter, traditional perspective, and modelling, as in Homage à Cézanne (1901). Denis’s monumental mural decorations are to be seen in many French churches as well as on the ceiling of the Champs Élysées Theatre in Paris. In 1919 he, along with Georges Devallières, founded the Studios of Sacred Art. His work was one of the chief forces in the revival of religious art in France.
[Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, Netherlands - Oil on canvas, 61 x 37.5 cm]

Maurice Denis - April [1892] on Flickr.

Maurice Denis (Granville, November 25, 1870 - Paris, November 13, 1943) was a French painter, and one of the leading artists and theoreticians of the Symbolist movement.

Denis studied at the Académie Julian (1888) under Jules Lefebvre and at the École des Beaux-Arts. Reacting against the naturalistic tendencies of Impressionism, Denis fell under the influence of the work of Paul Gauguin, whose style was also much admired by Denis’s fellow students Paul Sérusier, Édouard Vuillard, Pierre Bonnard, and Ker Xavier Roussel. With these friends, Denis joined in the Symbolist movement and its later offshoot, the group of painters collectively called the Nabis. The quasi-mystical attitude of the Nabis was perfectly suited to Denis’ highly religious nature. In 1890 Denis expressed the underlying principle of much modern painting in the following often-quoted words: “It should be remembered that a picture, before being a warhorse, a nude, or an anecdote of some sort, is essentially a flat surface covered with colours assembled in a certain order.”

Later, however, after visiting Italy, Denis became greatly influenced by the works of the great Italian fresco painters of the 14th and 15th centuries and began to place emphasis on subject matter, traditional perspective, and modelling, as in Homage à Cézanne (1901). Denis’s monumental mural decorations are to be seen in many French churches as well as on the ceiling of the Champs Élysées Theatre in Paris. In 1919 he, along with Georges Devallières, founded the Studios of Sacred Art. His work was one of the chief forces in the revival of religious art in France.

[Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, Netherlands - Oil on canvas, 61 x 37.5 cm]

April 16, 2014
Francesco Guardi - The Arsenal, Venice [1755-60] on Flickr.The gateway to the Arsenal is on the left. The building in the distance is the chapel of the Madonna dell’Arsenale. The composition is based on etchings by Carlevarijs and Marieschi. It has been suggested that this picture dates from around 1755-60 and is among the very earliest of Guardi’s view paintings.
[National Gallery, London - Oil on canvas, 62.3 x 96.9 cm]

Francesco Guardi - The Arsenal, Venice [1755-60] on Flickr.

The gateway to the Arsenal is on the left. The building in the distance is the chapel of the Madonna dell’Arsenale. The composition is based on etchings by Carlevarijs and Marieschi. It has been suggested that this picture dates from around 1755-60 and is among the very earliest of Guardi’s view paintings.

[National Gallery, London - Oil on canvas, 62.3 x 96.9 cm]

April 16, 2014
Paul Gauguin - At the Window [1882] on Flickr.The combination of objects in this still life is quite unusual, but apparently it resulted not only from the logic of formal juxtapositions but also from thematic considerations. For example, the lemon in the centre is the bright spot upon which the whole composition hangs, but like the other items on the table, it is also needed to prepare grog. Thus, next to the lemon are a bottle of very strong wine, sugar cubes, a glass for hot water, a spoon for mixing, and a large mug. Gauguin placed two of the objects next to each other with a certain note of irony: the intricately carved bottle and the massive mug of a most simple form. The present still life is noted not only for its Impressionist interest in reproducing light but for its strong composition.
[Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg - Oil on canvas, 54 x 65.3 cm]

Paul Gauguin - At the Window [1882] on Flickr.

The combination of objects in this still life is quite unusual, but apparently it resulted not only from the logic of formal juxtapositions but also from thematic considerations. For example, the lemon in the centre is the bright spot upon which the whole composition hangs, but like the other items on the table, it is also needed to prepare grog. Thus, next to the lemon are a bottle of very strong wine, sugar cubes, a glass for hot water, a spoon for mixing, and a large mug. Gauguin placed two of the objects next to each other with a certain note of irony: the intricately carved bottle and the massive mug of a most simple form. The present still life is noted not only for its Impressionist interest in reproducing light but for its strong composition.

[Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg - Oil on canvas, 54 x 65.3 cm]

April 15, 2014
Albert Heise - Im Panopticum [1892] on Flickr.The panopticon was among the most visited attractions in late nineteenth century Europe. The word itself derives from Greek mythology, the giant Panoptes with a hundred eyes was an all-seeing watchman, and likewise a ticket-buyer to the panopticon could spy everything and anything from lurid waxworks, collections of human oddities (both live performers and embalmed figures), rare specimens of medical and natural science, and historical curiosities, among a number of other categories of trivia. As bizarrely wonderful as panopticons were, they are largely forgotten today, leaving Heise’s depiction a rare and delightful record of this early mass-entertainment (the painting’s engraving further publicising both the Panopticum and the artist).
[Sotheby’s, New York - Oil on canvas, 106 x 80 cm]

Albert Heise - Im Panopticum [1892] on Flickr.

The panopticon was among the most visited attractions in late nineteenth century Europe. The word itself derives from Greek mythology, the giant Panoptes with a hundred eyes was an all-seeing watchman, and likewise a ticket-buyer to the panopticon could spy everything and anything from lurid waxworks, collections of human oddities (both live performers and embalmed figures), rare specimens of medical and natural science, and historical curiosities, among a number of other categories of trivia. As bizarrely wonderful as panopticons were, they are largely forgotten today, leaving Heise’s depiction a rare and delightful record of this early mass-entertainment (the painting’s engraving further publicising both the Panopticum and the artist).

[Sotheby’s, New York - Oil on canvas, 106 x 80 cm]

April 15, 2014
Eugénie Servières - Inês de Castro with Her Children at the Feet of Afonso IV, King of Portugal, Seeking Clemency for Her Husband, Don Pedro [1822] on Flickr.Eugénie Servières (Charen, 1786 - after 1824) was a French painter
[Chateau de Versailles - Oil on canvas]

Eugénie Servières - Inês de Castro with Her Children at the Feet of Afonso IV, King of Portugal, Seeking Clemency for Her Husband, Don Pedro [1822] on Flickr.

Eugénie Servières (Charen, 1786 - after 1824) was a French painter

[Chateau de Versailles - Oil on canvas]

April 15, 2014
Pieter de Hooch - In Empowering a Letter in a House [1670] on Flickr.[Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam - Oil on canvas, 68 x 59 cm]

Pieter de Hooch - In Empowering a Letter in a House [1670] on Flickr.

[Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam - Oil on canvas, 68 x 59 cm]

April 14, 2014
Edmund Charles Tarbell - Mother and Child in a Boat [1892] on Flickr.[Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - Oil on canvas, 76.52 x 88.9 cm]

Edmund Charles Tarbell - Mother and Child in a Boat [1892] on Flickr.

[Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - Oil on canvas, 76.52 x 88.9 cm]

April 14, 2014
Vincent van Gogh - Seascape near Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer [1888] on Flickr.“The Mediterranean Sea is a mackerel colour: in other words, changeable – you do not always know whether it is green or purple, you do not always know if it is blue, as the next moment the ever-changing sheen has assumed a pink or a grey tint,” Van Gogh wrote from Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer. In this fishing village, Vincent painted the effects of light on the sea, with small fishing vessels returning with the catch. The large bright red signature is striking: “because I wanted to have a red note in the green.”
[Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam - Oil on canvas, 51 x 64 cm]

Vincent van Gogh - Seascape near Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer [1888] on Flickr.

“The Mediterranean Sea is a mackerel colour: in other words, changeable – you do not always know whether it is green or purple, you do not always know if it is blue, as the next moment the ever-changing sheen has assumed a pink or a grey tint,” Van Gogh wrote from Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer. In this fishing village, Vincent painted the effects of light on the sea, with small fishing vessels returning with the catch. The large bright red signature is striking: “because I wanted to have a red note in the green.”

[Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam - Oil on canvas, 51 x 64 cm]

April 14, 2014
Claude-Oscar Monet - The Museum at Le Havre [1873] on Flickr.This is an important work which dates from a key period in the artist’s career. In the early 1870s Monet lived mainly at Argenteuil but made frequent trips to his home town, Le Havre, on the Normandy coast. In 1872 and 1873 he painted several views of the harbour at Le Havre. The view here is taken from one of the walls of the inner harbour looking across to the Musée des Beaux-Arts. The museum was destroyed during the Second World War and has since been replaced by a modern structure.
[National Gallery, London - Oil on canvas, 75 x 100 cm]

Claude-Oscar Monet - The Museum at Le Havre [1873] on Flickr.

This is an important work which dates from a key period in the artist’s career. In the early 1870s Monet lived mainly at Argenteuil but made frequent trips to his home town, Le Havre, on the Normandy coast. In 1872 and 1873 he painted several views of the harbour at Le Havre. The view here is taken from one of the walls of the inner harbour looking across to the Musée des Beaux-Arts. The museum was destroyed during the Second World War and has since been replaced by a modern structure.

[National Gallery, London - Oil on canvas, 75 x 100 cm]

April 13, 2014
Théodore Chassériau - Vénus Anadyomène [1838] on Flickr.[Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas, 65 x 55 cm]

Théodore Chassériau - Vénus Anadyomène [1838] on Flickr.

[Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas, 65 x 55 cm]

April 13, 2014
Théodore Chassériau - The Toilet of Esther [1841] on Flickr.The subject derives from the Book of Esther, in which King Ahasuerus, having renounced his wife Vashti, seeks a new queen. Esther, a woman of great beauty, finds favour with Hegai, the eunuch responsible for preparing women for presentation to the king. Upon seeing Esther, Ahasuerus chooses her as his wife. She later reveals that she is Jewish, and intercedes with the king in order to spare the lives of the empire’s Jews. 
Esther is shown seated at the centre of the canvas, arms above her head as she arranges her blond coiffure. Preparing to offer herself for the king’s approval, she holds a pose that is “profoundly erotic in its pictorial treatment.” She is nude to the waist except for a necklace and bracelets on her arms; her legs are swathed in white and rose-coloured garments. At the left a servant woman dressed in rich blue brings accessories, and at the right Hegai, clad in bright red, offers a jewel box. Esther acknowledges neither of them, staring out of the picture to the left. Behind them is a landscape of trees and sky.
[Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas, 45.5 x 35.5 cm]

Théodore Chassériau - The Toilet of Esther [1841] on Flickr.

The subject derives from the Book of Esther, in which King Ahasuerus, having renounced his wife Vashti, seeks a new queen. Esther, a woman of great beauty, finds favour with Hegai, the eunuch responsible for preparing women for presentation to the king. Upon seeing Esther, Ahasuerus chooses her as his wife. She later reveals that she is Jewish, and intercedes with the king in order to spare the lives of the empire’s Jews.

Esther is shown seated at the centre of the canvas, arms above her head as she arranges her blond coiffure. Preparing to offer herself for the king’s approval, she holds a pose that is “profoundly erotic in its pictorial treatment.” She is nude to the waist except for a necklace and bracelets on her arms; her legs are swathed in white and rose-coloured garments. At the left a servant woman dressed in rich blue brings accessories, and at the right Hegai, clad in bright red, offers a jewel box. Esther acknowledges neither of them, staring out of the picture to the left. Behind them is a landscape of trees and sky.

[Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas, 45.5 x 35.5 cm]

April 13, 2014
Théodore Chassériau - Susanna in Her Bath [1839] on Flickr.[Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas, 255 x 196 cm]

Théodore Chassériau - Susanna in Her Bath [1839] on Flickr.

[Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas, 255 x 196 cm]

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