July 28, 2014
John Collier - Lady Godiva [1898] on Flickr.[Herbert Art Gallery & Museum, Coventry - Oil on canvas, 142.2 x 183 cm]

John Collier - Lady Godiva [1898] on Flickr.

[Herbert Art Gallery & Museum, Coventry - Oil on canvas, 142.2 x 183 cm]

July 28, 2014
Jean-Léon Gérôme - L’Eminence Grise [1873] on Flickr.[Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - Oil on canvas, 27 x 39 inches]

Jean-Léon Gérôme - L’Eminence Grise [1873] on Flickr.

[Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - Oil on canvas, 27 x 39 inches]

July 28, 2014
Bartolomeo Veneto and Workshop - A Lady Playing a Lute [c.1530] on Flickr.Once thought to be a portrait by Leonardo da Vinci, this painting is now associated with Bartolomeo Veneto (Italian, active 1502 - Turin, 1531). Head tilted to the side and wearing an enigmatic expression, a young woman plays the lute. Instead of consulting the open book of music at the bottom of the painting, the lutist faces the viewer. A sheer veil covers her wavy hair, and embroidered and jewelled trimming lines the bodice and sleeves of her green velvet gown. A fur piece is draped over her left arm. Worn by high-ranking women in the 1500s, such furs were thought to keep away fleas. The many versions and derivations of this portrait made by different artists indicate that the subject enjoyed great popularity in Milan in the first half of the 1500s.
[Getty Centre, Los Angeles - Oil on panel, 22 x 16 1/4 inches]

Bartolomeo Veneto and Workshop - A Lady Playing a Lute [c.1530] on Flickr.

Once thought to be a portrait by Leonardo da Vinci, this painting is now associated with Bartolomeo Veneto (Italian, active 1502 - Turin, 1531). Head tilted to the side and wearing an enigmatic expression, a young woman plays the lute. Instead of consulting the open book of music at the bottom of the painting, the lutist faces the viewer. A sheer veil covers her wavy hair, and embroidered and jewelled trimming lines the bodice and sleeves of her green velvet gown. A fur piece is draped over her left arm. Worn by high-ranking women in the 1500s, such furs were thought to keep away fleas. The many versions and derivations of this portrait made by different artists indicate that the subject enjoyed great popularity in Milan in the first half of the 1500s.

[Getty Centre, Los Angeles - Oil on panel, 22 x 16 1/4 inches]

July 27, 2014
Stephen Bauman - When I Was Young on Flickr.
See: www.stephenbaumanart.com/
[Art Renewal Centre Salon - Oil on canvas, 45 x 60 inches]

Stephen Bauman - When I Was Young on Flickr.

See: www.stephenbaumanart.com/

[Art Renewal Centre Salon - Oil on canvas, 45 x 60 inches]

July 27, 2014
Winslow Homer - Winter Coast [1890] on Flickr.In 1891, one critic described Winter Coast as “A most bleak, cold, ‘shivery’ place.” Winslow Homer knew this shivery place well, as this cliff was visible from his studio in Prout’s Neck, Maine.
Many of Homer’s earlier works had focused on men and women who triumph over adverse nature. Over time, however, the painter increasingly emphasised the sublime beauty and power of the environment. Instead of heroic narratives, his later Maine seascapes focused on man’s often grim struggle to survive. While the hunter in this image has successfully snared a wild goose, he remains dwarfed by his surroundings, standing alone against the unrelenting Atlantic Ocean.
[Philadelphia Museum of Art - Oil on canvas, 91.8 x 80.5 cm]

Winslow Homer - Winter Coast [1890] on Flickr.

In 1891, one critic described Winter Coast as “A most bleak, cold, ‘shivery’ place.” Winslow Homer knew this shivery place well, as this cliff was visible from his studio in Prout’s Neck, Maine.

Many of Homer’s earlier works had focused on men and women who triumph over adverse nature. Over time, however, the painter increasingly emphasised the sublime beauty and power of the environment. Instead of heroic narratives, his later Maine seascapes focused on man’s often grim struggle to survive. While the hunter in this image has successfully snared a wild goose, he remains dwarfed by his surroundings, standing alone against the unrelenting Atlantic Ocean.

[Philadelphia Museum of Art - Oil on canvas, 91.8 x 80.5 cm]

July 27, 2014
Paul-Jacques-Aimé Baudry - The Wave and the Pearl [1862] on Flickr.Paul-Jacques-Aimé Baudry (La Roche-sur-Yon, November 7, 1828 - Paris, January 17, 1886) was a French painter. His talent from the first revealed itself as strictly academical, full of elegance and grace, but somewhat lacking originality. The works that crowned Baudry’s reputation were his mural decorations, which show much imagination and a high artistic gift for colour, as may be seen. in the frescoes in the Paris Court of Cassation at the Château de Chantilly, and above all, in the decorations of the foyer of the Opera Garnier. 
[Museo del Prado, Madrid - Oil on canvas, 83.5 x 178 cm]

Paul-Jacques-Aimé Baudry - The Wave and the Pearl [1862] on Flickr.

Paul-Jacques-Aimé Baudry (La Roche-sur-Yon, November 7, 1828 - Paris, January 17, 1886) was a French painter. His talent from the first revealed itself as strictly academical, full of elegance and grace, but somewhat lacking originality. The works that crowned Baudry’s reputation were his mural decorations, which show much imagination and a high artistic gift for colour, as may be seen. in the frescoes in the Paris Court of Cassation at the Château de Chantilly, and above all, in the decorations of the foyer of the Opera Garnier.

[Museo del Prado, Madrid - Oil on canvas, 83.5 x 178 cm]

July 26, 2014
Jan Brueghel the Elder - Parish Fair in Schelle [1614] on Flickr.[Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna - Oil on wood, 52 x 90.5 cm]

Jan Brueghel the Elder - Parish Fair in Schelle [1614] on Flickr.

[Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna - Oil on wood, 52 x 90.5 cm]

July 26, 2014
Ivan Aivazovsky - Constantinople on Flickr.Ivan Aivazovsky was a famous Russian artist specialising in seascape and landscape portraits. He was born into the family of a destitute Armenian merchant in the Crimean city of Feodosia on July 17, 1817. At the time of Aivazovsky’s birth the city was devastated after a recent war and was still suffering from the consequences of a plague epidemic that had affected the region in 1812. 
In 1846 Aivazovsky built his own workshop in his native Feodosia and spent most of his time there, behind closed doors, producing one picture after another. He no longer needed to go outdoors for inspiration - he had already seen so much of his beloved environment that he was able to produce canvases with amazing speed, almost that of a printing machine. By this time the artist has perfected his technique and invented so many tricks that he often astonished his visitors by creating a large canvas in a matter of hours. He died on May 2, 1900 at the age of 82.
[Musee des Beaux-Arts de Brest - Oil on canvas]

Ivan Aivazovsky - Constantinople on Flickr.

Ivan Aivazovsky was a famous Russian artist specialising in seascape and landscape portraits. He was born into the family of a destitute Armenian merchant in the Crimean city of Feodosia on July 17, 1817. At the time of Aivazovsky’s birth the city was devastated after a recent war and was still suffering from the consequences of a plague epidemic that had affected the region in 1812.

In 1846 Aivazovsky built his own workshop in his native Feodosia and spent most of his time there, behind closed doors, producing one picture after another. He no longer needed to go outdoors for inspiration - he had already seen so much of his beloved environment that he was able to produce canvases with amazing speed, almost that of a printing machine. By this time the artist has perfected his technique and invented so many tricks that he often astonished his visitors by creating a large canvas in a matter of hours. He died on May 2, 1900 at the age of 82.

[Musee des Beaux-Arts de Brest - Oil on canvas]

July 26, 2014
Camille Pisarro - Morning, An Overcast Day, Rouen [1896] on Flickr.While visiting Rouen in spring and fall 1896, Pissarro wrote of his interest in the “motif of the iron bridge on a rainy day, with much traffic, carriages, pedestrians, workers on the quays, boats, smoke, mist in the distance, the whole scene fraught with animation and life.” The present canvas is one of several views of the Boieldieu Bridge, or Grand Pont, that Pissarro painted from a room in the Hôtel d’Angleterre. Its title, “Matin, Temps Gris, Rouen,” is thought to be Pissarro’s own. Pissarro painted many of his city views of the 1890s and early 1900s from the windows of hotel rooms; he had developed an eye ailment that gradually prevented him from working outdoors.
[Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York - Oil on canvas, 54.3 x 65.1 cm]

Camille Pisarro - Morning, An Overcast Day, Rouen [1896] on Flickr.

While visiting Rouen in spring and fall 1896, Pissarro wrote of his interest in the “motif of the iron bridge on a rainy day, with much traffic, carriages, pedestrians, workers on the quays, boats, smoke, mist in the distance, the whole scene fraught with animation and life.” The present canvas is one of several views of the Boieldieu Bridge, or Grand Pont, that Pissarro painted from a room in the Hôtel d’Angleterre. Its title, “Matin, Temps Gris, Rouen,” is thought to be Pissarro’s own. Pissarro painted many of his city views of the 1890s and early 1900s from the windows of hotel rooms; he had developed an eye ailment that gradually prevented him from working outdoors.

[Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York - Oil on canvas, 54.3 x 65.1 cm]

July 25, 2014
Piero di Cosimo - A Satyr mourning over a Nymph [c.1495] on Flickr.A nymph lies on the grass, displaying wounds to her hand, wrist and throat. A satyr kneels, apparently mourning over her, while a dog sits at her feet. In the background other creatures, including a pelican, are depicted. The subject may be linked to the death of Procris. In Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Procris is described as being killed in error by her husband, Cephalus, to whom she had given a magical dog and a spear. Ovid does not mention a satyr, however, though one appears in a play of this subject by Niccolò da Correggio of 1486.
On the reverse of the panel is a drawing which may be the frame of a pilaster. The painting probably served as a spalliera (a backboard for a bench or chest), or as part of the panelling in a Florentine palace. Underdrawing is visible, notably on the bodies of the figures. The artist’s fingerprints appear extensively in the sky.
[National Gallery, London - Oil on poplar, 65.4 x 184.2 cm]

Piero di Cosimo - A Satyr mourning over a Nymph [c.1495] on Flickr.

A nymph lies on the grass, displaying wounds to her hand, wrist and throat. A satyr kneels, apparently mourning over her, while a dog sits at her feet. In the background other creatures, including a pelican, are depicted. The subject may be linked to the death of Procris. In Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Procris is described as being killed in error by her husband, Cephalus, to whom she had given a magical dog and a spear. Ovid does not mention a satyr, however, though one appears in a play of this subject by Niccolò da Correggio of 1486.

On the reverse of the panel is a drawing which may be the frame of a pilaster. The painting probably served as a spalliera (a backboard for a bench or chest), or as part of the panelling in a Florentine palace. Underdrawing is visible, notably on the bodies of the figures. The artist’s fingerprints appear extensively in the sky.

[National Gallery, London - Oil on poplar, 65.4 x 184.2 cm]

July 25, 2014
Auguste Couder - Opening of the Estates General, May 5, 1789 on Flickr.Summoned by King Louis XVI to propose solutions to his government’s financial problems, the Estates-General sat for several weeks in May and June 1789 but came to an impasse over the first item on the agenda, whether they should vote by estate, giving the first two estates an advantage, which was the king’s choice, or vote all together, giving the Third Estate the advantage. It was brought to an end when the Third Estate formed into a National Assembley, inviting the other two to join, against the wishes of the king, signalling the outbreak of the French Revolution.
[Musée National du Château de Versailles et du Trianon - Oil on canvas]

Auguste Couder - Opening of the Estates General, May 5, 1789 on Flickr.

Summoned by King Louis XVI to propose solutions to his government’s financial problems, the Estates-General sat for several weeks in May and June 1789 but came to an impasse over the first item on the agenda, whether they should vote by estate, giving the first two estates an advantage, which was the king’s choice, or vote all together, giving the Third Estate the advantage. It was brought to an end when the Third Estate formed into a National Assembley, inviting the other two to join, against the wishes of the king, signalling the outbreak of the French Revolution.

[Musée National du Château de Versailles et du Trianon - Oil on canvas]

July 25, 2014
Emilio Ocón y Rivas - Preparing for the Catch [1897] on Flickr.Emilio Ocón y Rivas (Malaga, 1845 - Malaga, 1904) was a Spanish painter. 
[Museo CarmenThyssen, Málaga - Oil on canvas, 56 x 89 cm]

Emilio Ocón y Rivas - Preparing for the Catch [1897] on Flickr.

Emilio Ocón y Rivas (Malaga, 1845 - Malaga, 1904) was a Spanish painter.

[Museo CarmenThyssen, Málaga - Oil on canvas, 56 x 89 cm]

July 24, 2014
Cornelis van Haarlem - A Fool with Two Women [1595] on Flickr.Van Thiel lists and reproduces two copies, both of whose whereabouts are unknown. Both these copies, like the present picture until a recent cleaning, have had the sausage painted out, presumably due to its overtly lewd connotations. In the first of the copies the sausage was turned into a cornucopia and in the second was painted out altogether and an owl added on the central figure’s raised hand. Van Thiel suggests that the large numbers of copies of this and other secular works from the 1590s attests to their popularity at the time. During the 1590s van Haarlem produced a number of paintings based around compositions comprised of three half-length figures. Numerous versions of his allegorical paintings on the choice between young and old illustrate his interest in exploring the dynamic between a trio of figures. 
[Sotheby’s, London - Oil on canvas, 72.5 x 90.5 cm]

Cornelis van Haarlem - A Fool with Two Women [1595] on Flickr.

Van Thiel lists and reproduces two copies, both of whose whereabouts are unknown. Both these copies, like the present picture until a recent cleaning, have had the sausage painted out, presumably due to its overtly lewd connotations. In the first of the copies the sausage was turned into a cornucopia and in the second was painted out altogether and an owl added on the central figure’s raised hand. Van Thiel suggests that the large numbers of copies of this and other secular works from the 1590s attests to their popularity at the time. During the 1590s van Haarlem produced a number of paintings based around compositions comprised of three half-length figures. Numerous versions of his allegorical paintings on the choice between young and old illustrate his interest in exploring the dynamic between a trio of figures.

[Sotheby’s, London - Oil on canvas, 72.5 x 90.5 cm]

July 24, 2014
Peter Paul Rubens - The Death of Adonis [c.1614] on Flickr.[Israel Museum, Jerusalem - Oil on canvas, 212 x 325 cm]

Peter Paul Rubens - The Death of Adonis [c.1614] on Flickr.

[Israel Museum, Jerusalem - Oil on canvas, 212 x 325 cm]

July 24, 2014
Jules-Adolphe-Aimé-Louis Breton - The Feast of Saint John [c.1875] on Flickr.Since ancient times, peasants have celebrated the longest days of summer with festivities. This dance around a fire marks the feast of Saint John the Baptist on June 24, an important occasion in France.
[Philadelphia Museum of Art - Oil on canvas, 34.3 x 61.3 cm]

Jules-Adolphe-Aimé-Louis Breton - The Feast of Saint John [c.1875] on Flickr.

Since ancient times, peasants have celebrated the longest days of summer with festivities. This dance around a fire marks the feast of Saint John the Baptist on June 24, an important occasion in France.

[Philadelphia Museum of Art - Oil on canvas, 34.3 x 61.3 cm]

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